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Thursday, December 14, 2017

Revision is a Process-How to Take the Frustration Out of Self-Editing


Revision is a Process –
How to Take the Frustration Out of Self-Editing
by Catherine E. McLean
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GENRE: Self-Help, Self-Improvement, Non-Fiction

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BLURB:

A first draft holds the possibility of what will be a great story. Revision turns that rough diamond into a spectacular gem worth a reader's money and time.

Writers are individuals but to be a producing writer means creating a system to revise and polish a work so the reader thoroughly enjoys the story. REVISION IS A PROCESS is a guidebook for writers and authors that shows how a simple 12-step process can be tailored to eliminate the most common and chronic maladies of writing genre fiction. This valuable guidebook contains secrets, tips, practical advice, how-to's, and why-to's for taking the frustration out of self-editing.

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EXCERPT:



From Section 1, An Overview of Revision is a Process

. . . revision is a process .  A logical, straightforward process where you don't try to find and fix everything at once. Instead, you break the monumental task into component parts and focus on only an item or two at a time.

Okay, so the reality is that creative people,  especially writers, hate logic and straightforwardness. And it's a fact that logic and creativity have always been at war with each other. After all, creativity gives a writer a high like no other. It's the fun part of writing and storytelling.

On the other hand, revising, rewriting, and self-editing are linear, logical, objective—and not fun.

But necessary.

Ever so necessary if one intends to be commercially successful in the writing business.

Here's something I've learned about writing and self-editing—a writer should find a middle ground. That means having the logical part of one's mind work with the subconscious imagination (the creative self).

It's about adopting a different view of self-editing—calling it a process—and diligently organizing that process into small steps that can easily be done. This gives a writer confidence that they have polished their story and increased its marketability.

I strongly believe, and have seen, that revision-as-a-process enables a writer to use both their left (logical) and right (creative) brain to become even more creative.

That's because the writer not only tailors a one-of-a-kind process but they also develop their own revision master cheat sheets. As a result, the creative subconscious (the imagination) becomes aware of the pitfalls and glitches that must be checked for, and subsequently, little by little, the creative self dishes up better first drafts with far fewer errors.


A Word From the Author:

What would I tell a new author?

Ever hear of the adage you can lead a horse to water but you cannot make them drink? Well, most people reading this won't drink the water of wisdom, which is: Stop writing and learn craft before you commit to that next novel or even publishing it.

Why such seemingly harsh advice? Because the truth is, people were not taught to write fiction or be storytellers. Schools teach enough English for people to be able to communicate with others, relay facts and figures, report in a telling and concrete way about events, and expound with argumentation. Such things make for a base. However, to tell a story well is to showcase a protagonist going on a journey. That journey can be heart-wrenching, soul-wrenching, or even mind-wrenching. Fiction isn't about facts but of larger than life characters, fantasy realms, and wonderment all woven into the fabric of a story.
                 
Writing to touch another mind and cause a movie to play out as the words are read means knowing the foundation, the fundamentals, and the tropes of what story is for the genre being written.
                 
Far too many new writers are unaware that there is a blueprint (or foundation) to a story that appeals to readers. Think about this: there are twenty story plot types for fiction and 144 aspects to writing a novel. No one book includes them all. How do you learn what they are and how they are woven together to net a marketable story? By reading how-to books on the various aspects of fiction, by going to writing workshops and conferences, and by networking with other writers who willingly share insights and knowledge by giving feedback (not criticism). 
                 
I, myself, have studied (not just read but studied) over 400 how-to-write books on fiction and storytelling. That's an accurate number because I keep a list. Why do I keep a list? Because I bought the same book three times and didn't realize it because the covers were not the same! I've also taken university and continuing college educational courses, online courses, and workshops to hone my skills. The proof is in editors and agents saying I write well and tell a story well.
                 
Talent will take you only so far. It is craft that will enhance and showcase that storytelling talent.
                 
If you are curious about the 144 Aspects of a Novel, I'll be giving an online course hosted by Pennwriters (www.pennwriters.org) in February 2018 for it. Updates and information will be posted at http://www.writerscheatsheets.com/upcoming-workshops.html



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AUTHOR Bio and Links:

Catherine E. McLean's lighthearted, short stories have appeared in hard cover and online anthologies and magazines. Her books include JEWELS OF THE SKY, KARMA & MAYHEM, HEARTS AKILTER, and ADRADA TO ZOOL (a short story anthology). She lives on a farm nestled in the foothills of the Allegheny Mountains of Western Pennsylvania. In the quiet of the countryside, she writes lighthearted tales of phantasy realms and stardust worlds (fantasy, futuristic, and paranormal) with romance and advenure. She is also a writing instructor and workshop speaker. Her nonfiction book for writers is REVISION IS A PROCESS - HOW TO TAKE THE FRUSTRATION OUT OF SELF-EDITING.

● Hub Website: http://www.CatherineEmclean.com

● Website for writers:  http://www.WritersCheatSheets.com

● Writers Cheat Sheets Blog: https://writerscheatsheets.blogspot.com

● Linked-In:
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/catherine-e-mclean/7/70b/372 

● Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/catherine.e.mclean.5

● Twitter:  https://twitter.com/#!/CatherineMcLea7

● Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/catherinemclean

● Amazon Author Page:
http://www.amazon.com/Catherine-E.-McLean/e/B00A3BVG6I/

● Link to buy REVISION IS A PROCESS at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0988587440

● Link to buy REVISION IS A PROCESS at Barnes & Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/revision-is-a-process-catherine-e-mclean/1126295618


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GIVEAWAY INFORMATION and RAFFLECOPTER CODE

One randomly chosen winner via rafflecopter will win a $50 Amazon/BN.com gift card.




a Rafflecopter giveaway


78 comments:

Goddess Fish Promotions said...

Thanks for hosting!

Nikolina Vukelic said...

I really enjoyed reading the guest post, thank you!

Lisa Brown said...

congrats on the tour and thanks for the chance to win :)

Catherine said...

Good morning and thank you Elaine for having me today as your guest.

Victoria Alexander said...

Great post and thanks for the awesome giveaway :)

Kathy Otten said...

I always wanted to be a writer and when I was in high school and college I took every creative writing class I could, but hated taking English grammar. Now I've learned to be a good fiction writer, that everything I learned in creative writing class was wrong and I should have spent more time learning grammar, commas, and sentence structure.

Catherine said...

Hi, Kathy,

I actually was flabbergasted at how good I was in English and I loved diagramming sentences. But my aim was to be a secretary and I needed all those rules because when taking dictation, you were not to make the boss look a fool on paper! LOL I'll also agree that creative writing courses I took didn't help with writing fiction. What really helped was taking journalism. That's why I am so quick to tell writers to take Journalism and forego English Lit studies. I was at a conference a number of years ago where the entire panel of agents and editors were asked what was the best courses to take and ALL were unanimous that those writes who took the English route had to relearn how to write fiction. I'll also admit, Kathy, that your historical novels have kept me reading all night just to get to 'the end.' You write well and tell a story well.

Catherine said...

The day has drawn to a close and I thank my host and all who stopped by. I wish you all success in all your writing endeavors. Good night and have a joyous Christmas Season!

Melissa Breusch said...

Seems like a great book for those of who could use a hand in self editing and can't afford a pro.

Melissa Breusch said...

Is it possible for an author to do self-editing all the way on their own or do you think an actual editor is still needed to go over your work?

Melissa Breusch said...

Have a blessed weekend in Jesus Name.

Melissa Breusch said...

Have a great New Year and thanks 4 the giveaway!

Melissa Breusch said...

Thanks Catherine and the same to you in your writing endeavors.

MEL said...

I discovered my writing aficionado in the past year, but I will always remember my the appreciation a story I wrote in high school got the teacher wanted me to be the first to read it aloud to the class.

Melissa Breusch said...

I myself have a few how-to books at home, have read over 350 books in 3 years time, but have not been to writing workshops, and I don't mind the insight that may be given.

Melissa Breusch said...

I have read several books. I try to ignore some typos, left out words, and sentences that don't make sense, but I remember reading this one book someone published (it was a free book on Kindle) and I tossed from my reading collection for such terrible grammar and other such issues. People should learn how to self-edited. Seriously, if you are going to through the trouble to publish something than at least care about your work.

Melissa Breusch said...

Yes, I know I just published that last comment with a typo. Lol. Perfect example for me not self-editing.

Melissa Breusch said...

Definitely on my TRL.

Melissa Breusch said...

Thanks 4 hosting.

Melissa Breusch said...

Have a Happy New Year everyone.

Melissa Breusch said...

Hope everyone here had a blessed New Year.

Melissa Breusch said...

Faith. Hope. Love. The greatest of these is Love.

Melissa Breusch said...

Gotta find some reading groups so I can trust someone enough to help in my editing because someone can always catch something you did not.

Melissa Breusch said...

Have a great weekend everyone.

Melissa Breusch said...

I feel like I will finally be able to come out of hibernation by Sunday or Monday from this cold snap. Lol

Melissa Breusch said...

Gotta add this book to my TRL.

Melissa Breusch said...

I will take a little snow over the frigid temps we had any day.

Melissa Breusch said...

This book seems like an invaluable resource to have if you are in the process of writing a book and moreover I have not found a book in my local library system that comes close to this.

Melissa Breusch said...

Only on the first chapter of my own book, and I hope this book would be added to my library system's catalog.

Melissa Breusch said...

The one area I have the most difficulty with for sure is the use of a comma vs. a semi-colon.

Melissa Breusch said...

Hope everyone is enjoying the January thaw. I hope to add this book to my collection soon.

Melissa Breusch said...

I sometimes find myself editing while I am writing it out and even though I when I thought I ironed out everything later on in rereading I find errors. If it is an online blog for instance. Sometimes it is helpful to print out copy and then you find more errors from my experience.

Melissa Breusch said...

Thanks ahead time for all the advise in the book as I do intend to get it.

Melissa Breusch said...

As a person with little budget if you are good with grammar, but need some extra advice self-editing is the way to go.

Melissa Breusch said...

Thanks 4 the time you put into hosting this blog.

Melissa Breusch said...

Now I am adding this book to my wish list on Amazon for a future date when I near the end when I must edit my book.

Melissa Breusch said...

Have a great weekend everyone and for those editing here is hoping it is not tedious.

Melissa Breusch said...

Just started a prologue for my own book even though I finished chapter 1 first I guess that happens during editing. So I can really use a book like this when I am through writing.

Melissa Breusch said...

My book is coming along and this editing book will come in handy as a useful tool for me.

Melissa Breusch said...

Thanks again or hosting this blog/giveaway.

Melissa Breusch said...

Editing takes patience and I hope this book has tips 2 take out the frustration of that.

Melissa Breusch said...

I will have to check into your other writings because I love reading about fantasy realms and such.

Melissa Breusch said...

Thanks so much for hosting this tour. God bless.

Melissa Breusch said...

February 1st. That much closer to spring and then some of us can read and write outdoors again.

Melissa Breusch said...

I know we have 6 more weeks of winter without groundhog. Maybe I will write story on Phil's deception. Lol While everyone is hunkered down in their homes for the last half of winter may your editing woes be few.

Melissa Breusch said...

Have a great weekend and happy editing.

Melissa Breusch said...

Tip: If you are getting bogged down by editing take a break and then come back to it a little later.

Melissa Breusch said...

If you find yourself editing while you are writing let me know. It's hard to leave all the editing until later. Lol

Melissa Breusch said...

Does this book by chance cover writer's block and how to more effectively write a paragraph? A part of my prologue in my own book sounds confusing even though it is correct grammatically and otherwise? Just was wondering about rewording things.

Melissa Breusch said...

It wasn't lost on me that there is a typo in the previous comment. Lol

Melissa Breusch said...

Thanks 4 hosting this and the giveaway. Congrats again.

Melissa Breusch said...

Does this book cover things such as syntax and other things pertaining parts of speech? Does this book cover examples of editing?

Melissa Breusch said...

What is the area that you find people have trouble with the most in the editing process?

Melissa Breusch said...

Do you prefer ebooks or print?

Melissa Breusch said...

What made you want to write a book on the editing?

Melissa Breusch said...

I meant to say "...the editing process?"

Melissa Breusch said...

I always find myself editing while I am writing the book I am writing. I heard that you should leave editing for later. Do you find that to be true?

Melissa Breusch said...

I am a stickler punctuation, grammar, etc. in editing, but I have so much to learn about it. So thanks 4 hosting this again.

Melissa Breusch said...

I hope to read this book soon as I progress in my own writing and learn through the pitfalls of editing.

Melissa Breusch said...

Editing not fun and hopefully as the book suggests it will take the frustration out of it.

Melissa Breusch said...

Errors in above comment: Proceed with caution. Lol

Melissa Breusch said...

What do you think people have the biggest hang-up with when it comes to editing?

Melissa Breusch said...

Do you think using a hyphen is appropriate for a pause in thought for character's words?

Melissa Breusch said...

I think the book cover is very appropriate for what is covered in the book given the book illuminates insight into editing.

Melissa Breusch said...

Appropriately using punctuation is pretty difficult for me sometimes. Hope this book helps that.

Melissa Breusch said...

May everyone's editing be frustration free.

Melissa Breusch said...

Do prefer listening to audiobooks or e-books to read?

Melissa Breusch said...

Will you be having your editing book in ebook format if it is not already?

Melissa Breusch said...

I wonder if there is a way to make editing fun?

Melissa Breusch said...

When I am done typing up the draft of my book I will need all the help a book such as this can give.

Melissa Breusch said...

Thanks 4 such a book as this.

Melissa Breusch said...

When I see the title for you book, it speaks to me (not literally of course) in that other titles I don't jump out to me like this one.

Melissa Breusch said...

Looks like I will be doing some edits on my book as I found tie ins based on research for it. Editing oh, the thrills.

Melissa Breusch said...

I wonder here looking at my last comment about hyphens and when to use them for certain words such as: "tie-ins" or "tie ins". Hmm?

Melissa Breusch said...

This book I hope will take the frustration out of editing as the book indicates because editing takes discipline.

Melissa Breusch said...

One of the hardest challenges is editing in WordPress because when I thought I had each article perfect and it isn't until I print it out that I see my errors. Lol, advice: Print before you publish.

Melissa Breusch said...

Thanks so much for this giveaway and congratulations once again on your book tour.

Melissa Breusch said...

What do you find to be the most challenging part of editing?